zeborah: Zebra with mop and text: Clean all the things! (housework)
[personal profile] zeborah
I don't know how many of these methods I'll keep up in the long-term, but I thought I'd list them in case they're of use or interest to anyone else.

Essentially I found myself in a mood to ask myself, just how much plastic is passing into the environment via my purchasing habits? Even though I send a lot of it to recycling, that's its own use of energy. Mostly I was looking at my grocery shopping:


  • I already take my own reusable bags (or reuse old plastic bags) at the checkout, and for fruit as well. I do like to get the occasional new plastic bag for use as bin-liners; I'm going to try emptying their contents directly into the red bin for a while, instead of tying the bags off and putting them in all together. But I haven't found myself throwing much into the red bin since making this resolution so no data on how that goes.

  • A 2L plastic bottle of milk every 7-10 days. And you can't even reuse milk bottles to store water against emergencies; hygiene aside, the plastic breaks down over time. Speaking of emergencies, though, I'd been considering getting a bag of milk powder for my supplies. So I thought I'd try it in every-day use. So far it's worked well in baking, yoghurt-making, hot chocolate, and morning cereal, ie all my normal uses except drinking straight from the fridge, which will wait until summer for testing. It takes a few moments extra in the morning to mix it (my preferred method: boil the jug, dissolve the powder in a bit of boiling water, then add cold to desired strength) but it's become part of my routine over the last couple of weeks so I think I will keep this one up. Bonuses: here at least it's significantly cheaper than fresh milk; no running out at inconvenient moments; and conversely no finding that it's gone sour before I've finished it.

  • A plastic bag around my bread each week. I've revived my bread-making to avoid this; to be honest it's the one I'm least likely to keep up. OTOH I have discovered that if I bake the bread and let the oven cool somewhat but not completely, it's a great place to incubate yoghurt overnight. And the bread is so tasty - it's just the time it takes. We'll see. I may just keep going through phases on it.

  • A plastic bag of muesli every week or so. I'm experimenting with pick-n-mix (taking my own bags) but pick-n-mix rolled oats alone cost about the same as (budget) prepackaged muesli. :-( Does anyone know why rolled oats and muesli come in plastic, when flour and sugar come in paper??

  • A couple of plastic packages of shaved ham every few weeks. (The recycling status of which I was never sure about, so red-binned them!) Careful attention revealed that cheap ham at the deli is cheaper than cheap ham prepackaged. Moreover today I was brave and found out that if you take your own container along they'll use that instead of a fresh plastic bag. (At least the guy I struck today did, and even set the scales to discount the weight of the container though I wouldn't have minded that little bit.) So I just need to keep organised.



Beyond plastic - I've also taken to washing dishes in a tub, and using the water on the garden. (Someone at church has set up her laundry pipes to use water from that on the garden; I think I'd just flood the house.)

And recently I came across SolarAid, a charity whose selling point is that you can 'offset your carbon' from flights you make by funding solar-powered lights for personal use (eg kids doing homework) in developing countries to replace kerosene, which besides emitting copious carbon dioxide is expensive, not that bright, and seriously unhealthy. It seems win-win-win so I looked for a catch but couldn't find any.

Anyway this came at a time shortly after a) I'd made some international flights and b) I'd received a tax rebate from last year's charitable donations so next thing you know I'd apparently donated enough to get sent an example solar light in the mail. It just arrived today, and it's cute and lightweight and works out of the packaging, and I'm weighing up whether it goes in my emergency kit or to City Mission here because goodness knows it's not just kids in the developing world who can't do homework due to lack of money for power.:-(

Garbage around the world

Date: 2017-09-22 02:59 pm (UTC)
hairmonger: engraving of Brown Leghorns (Default)
From: [personal profile] hairmonger
Flour and sugar come in paper here, too. Plain rolled oats are available in both packaging, but mixed cereals always have some plastic around them somehow. And in my city plastic that doesn't have a recycling number stamped on it--such as what wraps deli ham--is not accepted for recycling.

Many long years ago, in the eighties, my coop ran an experiment with plastic vs. cellophane: we bagged various bulk purchase items and let them sit six months and then taste-tested them. I was part of the tasting team. (Yum.)We found that most things tasted the same from each type of packaging, but dried fruits tasted noticeably fresher from cellophane. However, for bureaucratic reasons (maybe?) we kept using plastic bags.

I, too, use plastic grocery bags as bin liners. (My city objects to garbage placed directly into the collection container.) I use my own bags when I have a sufficiency of plastic bags. I don't put fruit into packaging unless it comes that way, and since I use self-check I don't drive the cashiers crazy.

I get enough rain that using the dishwater to water plants would create a swamp. I did, at a former house, have a flower bed close enough to the laundry room door that I would sometimes water it with an extension to the washing machine hose. It was in a rain shadow.

Most of the time when I read ways to save plastic or energy or whatever I think "What? People don't do that already?" (having grown up with people who grew up without electricity or running water will do that to you) but you have several ideas I have never tried. Thanks for this.

Mary Anne in Kentucky

Date: 2017-09-22 09:02 pm (UTC)
catherineldf: (Default)
From: [personal profile] catherineldf
Very cool! I've been running an annual tally on my blog every Earth Day about what we've changed or added or replaced that lowers our impact and you're right, a lot of it is cheaper in the long run.

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